August 2021 update

Not happy with another car bill on the horizon, I decided the best thing for it was to sell the car. I did the usual of checking out the dealer buy-back price, We Buy Any Car, and the local garage but none of them could come close to motorway.co.uk

I took a load of photos of the car, chatted with them about the condition and they sent the details out to all their buyers. The next day I had a really good offer come in that was £2.5k higher than expected. So, the next week the Polestar was loaded onto a transporter and made its way up to Edinburgh.

Farewell!

Bit disappointed with the V60 Polestar in terms of reliability, my previous V60 I had for a couple of years longer and it just needed new tyres.

It was a beast of a car and so much fun to drive but by selling that I could buy a Toyota Auris hybrid which saved me £585 car tax each year, around £100/year insurance, and sooo much on petrol. Plus it left me with a fair-sized pot of money 🙂

With the extra cash sitting in the bank I decided to pay off my student loan so I called them up, got my redemption figure and paid straight away. Such a good feeling to know that another debt has been cleared. I know people have mixed feelings on paying off their student loan and some see it more as a “tax”.

Interesting thing is, after a few days the online balance for my loan showed the debt had been cleared and also that there was a small credit on the account – not sure how that would be given that we worked off a redemption figure. Oh well!

Of actually annoyance though was that my employer still took a student loan repayment from my pay this month and that hasn’t shown up on my loan account. I guess the notice from SLC & HMRC hadn’t been received in time. Not the end of the world as I expect to get that repaid some point in September.

Talking about repayments, I should be getting my car tax refund through next month too which should be around the £450 mark. I’m in two minds as to whether invest it or tuck it away in a new savings pot potentialy to pay for my Masters degree.

The frugle side of me takes over this time of year when both my car and home insurance come up for renewal. This kick-starts a flurry of comparision site searches for the best deal which I then check against TopCashBack for any further goodness.

This year I have saved £30 off my car insurance and got roadside recovery included plus £40 cashback from using the TopCashBack service.

At the time of writing I have still to finalise my home insurance but my renewal offer is the same as last year so at least I know I’ll not be paying more if I decide to stay with them.

Additional Income Streams

  • Matched Betting £29 (July £9.16)
  • Surveys/studies £0.93 (July £0)
  • Amazon FBA/eBay/FB Marketplace £50 (July £13.79)
  • TopCashBack £0.14 (July £2.37)

Continued to clear out items via eBay and Facebook Marketplace, mainly due to pressure from my wife! 😀

I know some of the items I’ve sold could have been priced higher but to be fair, I just wanted the items gone. At the end of the month, anything that was being advertised and hadn’t generated any interest was taken to the local Nansa charity shop.

The income from matched betting is starting to be a more consistent flow as I’m making more effort to take adavantage of bet clubs and offers around the football World Cup and a few other major sporting events. Still a long way off what I was making in my early matched betting days but something is better than nothing.

I use a service called Odds Monkey to help with my matched betting, I’ve been using them for several months now and find the tools they provide to be essential in making a profit. If you are interested then drop me a message or you can sign-up via my affiliate link – OddsMonkey. The great thing is you can do as much or as little as you like and it fits around your life.

How did I do in August?

Assets

  • Emergency Fund £3,192.51 (July £2,928.621)
  • ISA, Freetrade £4,240.64 (July £3,228.42)
  • ISA, Hargreaves Lansdown £3,435.97 (July £3,249.52)
  • Pensions £120,869.69 (July £117,335.14)
  • SAYE £660.00 (July £630.00)
  • House £375,000 (£360,099) *Nationwide HPI 2020 Q4

Liabilities

  • Student Loan +£13 (July -£2,503.82)
  • Mortgage -£185641.19 (July -£187,074.21)

Total Assets (excluding house) – Total Liabilities = Net Worth
£132,398.81 – £185,628.19 = -£53,229.38 (July -£62,236.33)

Month-on-month

Very satisfying to have that final payment listed in the spreadsheet this month. It will feel strange not reporting on any debts next month!

Slightly up on the EF payments – these are a combination of round-ups on certain transactions plus regular payments.

Future Fund

Future Fund

My next milestone is £150,000 for my Future Fund. It’s great to see this number increasing and my negative networth (excluding house) inching toward a positive figure.

Dividends

Just under £40 for this year and with four months to go, it’s looking good for my target. My average monthly dividends are £4.92 which is nearly enough to cover one of our mobile phone bills 😀

Goals

Read more – not so much reading this month, the same with audiobooks which I normally listen to when walking Skyla – I’ve just been enjoying the sounds of nature which I find very calming.

Exercise more – August was a real struggle for exercising as I’d managed to get golfers elbow, also known as tendinitis, from weight lifting. This really set me back mentally and as a result, I didn’t attend many classes at all. I did finish the month strongly though with a Body Attack class and two treadmill sessions in the final weekend. This got me just enough MEPs to meet the minimum monthly target.

Learn more – I spent quite a bit of time working through an ethical hacking course which I found really interesting, so far I have been able to use a Kali Linux VM, USB wireless adapter, and a few packages to run deauth attacks. I’ve only done this on my wireless network for obvious reasons (I don’t want to end up in jail!) but it was cool to be able to prevent one of my Echo Dots from connecting to the Internet 🙂

I have also been spending some time looking into a framework called Flutter, which is used to develop good looking, cross-platform mobile apps.

Earn more – Effectively by paying off my student loan I will be bringing home a bit more money each month which could count as extra earnings – a pound saved is a pound earned, right? 🙂

Guest Post

If you are interested in writing a guest post for my blog, you can reach out to me via the contact page or by taking a look at the let’s work together page – it would be great to hear from you!

July 2021 update

There’s been an ongoing theme with my recent posts…

Car bills!

This month I noticed a ticking/clicking sound when getting toward full lock in either direction. The car had a similar fault a while ago which Volvo sorted under warranty, typically this instance occurred after the warranty just expired.

A trip to my local independent garage put me on course for an approximately £1700 bill to replace the CV joints/driveshafts. To be fair, the mechanic said the car will be fine to drive for a good while and that if it were his car, he’d leave it as-is.

Additional Income Streams

  • Matched Betting £9.16 (June £25)
  • Surveys/studies £0 (June £1.42)
  • Amazon FBA/eBay/FB Marketplace £13.79 (June £22.44)
  • TopCashBack £2.37 (June £7.08)

My sales of unwanted items have been spread across eBay and Facebook Marketplace this month, I’m finding Marketplace both good and bad. Good in that there are usually quite a few people interested in what I’m selling but also bad in that you get let down by a lot of people not turning up when they arrange to.

I use a service called Odds Monkey to help with my matched betting, I’ve been using them for several months now and find the tools they provide to be essential in making a profit. If you are interested then drop me a message or you can sign-up via my affiliate link – OddsMonkey. The great thing is you can do as much or as little as you like and it fits around your life.

How did I do in July?

Assets

  • Emergency Fund £2,928.62 (June £2,680.41)
  • ISA, Freetrade £3,228.42 (June £3260.25)
  • ISA, Hargreaves Lansdown £3,249.52 (June £3207.80)
  • Pensions £117,335.14 (June £116,113.19)
  • SAYE £630.00 (June £600.00)
  • House £375,000 (£360,099) *Nationwide HPI 2020 Q4

Liabilities

  • Student Loan -£2,503.82 (June -£2,613.17)
  • Mortgage -£187,074.21 (June -£188,013.56)

Total Assets (excluding house) – Total Liabilities = Net Worth
£127,341.70 – £189,578.03 = -£62,236.33 (June -£64765.61 )

Month-on-month figures are consistent with last month.

I can’t recall how long my SAYE scheme is running for, might have to look into that and see when I can take up the share purchase, or withdraw the money – whichever works out best.

Future Fund

Future Fund

Small increase this month but still moving in the right direction.

Dividends

Smaller income this month but still a marked improvement compared to this time last year: £2.66 (2021) vs £0.07 (2020).

Goals

I can’t remember having shared my goals for this year before but I’ll mention a few of them here:

Read more – continuing to read “How Google Works” as well as listen to “Leadership Strategy and Tactics” by Jocko Willink.

Exercise more – I use a MyZone belt to track my effort when exercising, it measures the effort in MEPs (MyZone Effort Points). Each month to keep my progress level, I need to attain a minimum of 1300 MEPs, represented by the red line. The green line represents my target of 2000 MEPs which is a bit harder to hit consistently.

Learn more – I’ve spent more time on PluralSight this month, watching an updated video about Kanban (work planning and organistation) as well as “Developing a Google SRE Culture“.

Earn more – My dividend earnings so far this year are £36.98, my target £50 so I think there’s a fair chance I will make that.

Guest Post

If you are interested in writing a guest post for my blog, you can reach out to me via the contact page or by taking a look at the let’s work together page – it would be great to hear from you!

June 2021 update

Another month, another car bill 😦

This month it was a replacement tyre as the front nearside wall got sliced on something as I was on my way to pick up my daughter from a nearby village. Fortunately I wasn’t going fast when it happened but I knew straight away it wasn’t good.

With my previous Volvo, I had a puncture which I could seal using the provided temporary repair kit but this time round there was no chance of it working. I was able to phone my dad who drove out to pick up my daughter and her friends while I waited with the car.

The emergency call out and new budget tyre came to £200 which was a nasty unplanned expense but it was manageable. Fingers crossed for an incident-free July!

Additional Income Streams

  • Matched Betting £25 (May £28)
  • Surveys/studies £1.42 (May £0.24)
  • Amazon FBA/eBay £22.44 (May £487)
  • TopCashBack £7.08 (May £30.96)

Bit quieter this month across the income streams; just clearing out a few more items on eBay – I had a few buyers from overseas who pulled out as they hadn’t checked the amount of import tax they would have to pay. Not very helpful as it loses me time in running the auction for another week plus potential buyers who may have found an alternative in the mean time.

I use a service called Odds Monkey to help with my matched betting, I’ve been using them for several months now and find the tools they provide to be essential in making a profit. If you are interested then drop me a message or you can sign-up via my affiliate link – OddsMonkey. The great thing is you can do as much or as little as you like and it fits around your life.

How did I do in June?

Assets

  • Emergency Fund £2,680.41 (May £2,441.91)
  • ISA, Freetrade £3260.25 (May £3,155.58)
  • ISA, Hargreaves Lansdown £3207.80 (May £2,985.23)
  • Pensions £116,113.19 (May £112,741.54)
  • SAYE £600.00 (May £570.00)
  • House £375,000 (£360,099) *Nationwide HPI 2020 Q4

Liabilities

  • Student Loan -£2,613.17 (May -£2,803.43)
  • Mortgage -£188,013.56 (May -£188,430.57)

Total Assets (excluding house) – Total Liabilities = Net Worth
£125861.65 – £190627.26 = -£64765.61 (May -£69,339.74)

Month-on-month

Mostly the same as May, just a touch down on the payments to the Emergency Fund.

Not much too say on the month-on-month figures. Guess that is kind of good as it indicates stability and consistency?

Future Fund

Future Fund

Woohoo! Blew past the £120k mark this month with a total of £123,711.65 – happy days! 🙂

Dividends

Best month yet in terms of dividends, this month’s £15.87 has dwarfed the amount (£0.95) from this time last year. It’s so nice to see improvements in the dividend payments, hopefully I’ll be able to reach the goal of £50 this year.

Goals

I can’t remember having shared my goals for this year before but I’ll mention a few of them here:

Read more – hardly a SMART goal but I do want to spend more time reading and less time on Netflix. So far it isn’t going too badly, I am currently reading “How Goolge Works” as well as listening to “Work Rules” which is another book about how Google works. Bit of a trend there eh?

In earlier months I have relistened (for the third time) to “Your Money or Your Life” by Vicki Robin, I like this book a lot and have gleaned useful pointers from it each time. “Unshakeable” by Tony Robbins which is on my list to go over again.

I also listened to “The Automatic Millionaire” which, contrary to popular opinion, I didn’t rate all that highly.

Exercise more – I set a base line of three times a week for this. I’m hitting the target most weeks, only when I’m not feeling well do I miss my sessions. My typical week would look like:

  • Monday – RPM 45 minutes
  • Tuesday – Arms session
  • Wednesday – BodyCombat 60 minutes
  • Thursday – Back & shoulders
  • Saturday – BodyAttack 45 minutes
  • Sunday – Legs

I do sometimes give the weights a miss, or do a weights & cardio session in the same day, really depends on how I feel. Comabt & Attack give me between a 900 and 1200 calorie burn, the weights sessions are lower but still a good workout. With that in mind, you’d think my weight would be going down but no, it has other ideas and has been on an upward trajectory 😦

Learn more – Over the past few months I have really picked up the pace on PluralSight (online training) and I’ve been looking at Google SRE (Site Reliability Engineering), C#, and management videos. With all of those I find it easy enough to dip in to the course for anywhere from 30 minutes upward each day as they are usually pretty easy to leave & pick-up.

Earn more – My target for passive income from dividends is £50 this year, not a big number at all but it is in keeping with the size of portfolio I have right now. I have received a pay rise earlier in the year which was great and it staves off the desrire to look elsewhere for a better paid job which I am more than happy about.

Guest Post

If you are interested in writing a guest post for my blog, you can reach out to me via the contact page or by taking a look at the let’s work together page – it would be great to hear from you!

May 2021 update

May was a mixed bag of ups and downs for me…

I started the month with a reoccurrence of depression which overlapped the May Day weekend and resulted in a week off work. This was followed by some positivity when I moved my tech blog, Knight Talks Tech, from Hostgator to Google Cloud Platform (GCP).

After seeing a note about using GCP from Saving Ninja in a Slack channel I’m part of I thought it was well worth a look. Ninja had said how he had set up WordPress in GCP having followed a video by a guy on YouTube, I watched the video and completed some of the steps. Things got in the way and I became distracted from completing the work.

I came back to this though having received an email from HostGator saying that my renewal was coming up and asking for a load of money from me. I wasn’t prepared to pay a couple of hundred pounds so that was incentive enough for me.

There were a few moments when I needed to do some supplementary Googling as things have moved on since the video had been created, but other than that, it all went well. In fact, having got to the end of the video, links for a revised instructional were then being promoted! 😀

Bit of a frugal move as it costs me £10/year for the .com domain and around 90 pence/month for hosting, definitely better than around £200 from HostGator.

Additional Income Streams

  • Matched Betting £28 (Apr £16)
  • Surveys/studies £0.24 (Apr £2.98)
  • Amazon FBA/eBay £487 (Apr £0)
  • TopCashBack £30.96 (Apr £0)

I made a fair bit via eBay this month selling off a few unwanted things like my son’s old moped (£349) and a couple of MyZone fitness belts (£100) which I no longer needed as I have the latest version. Selling the moped made a big difference financially as well as mentally, having it gone feels like a weight has been lifted.

The money from the moped went toward fitting a new carpet up the stairs and on the landing. The other eBay proceeds, TopCashBack money and vouchers I get for being part of a COVID-19 survey I used toward a 2020 iPad Air from John Lewis.

My profits remain on the low side for matched betting although I am hoping that will pick up next month when the Euros come round.

I use a service called Odds Monkey to help with my matched betting, I’ve been using them for several months now and find the tools they provide to be essential in making a profit. If you are interested then drop me a message or you can sign-up via my affiliate link – OddsMonkey. The great thing is you can do as much or as little as you like and it fits around your life.

How did I do in May?

Assets

  • Emergency Fund £2,441.91 (Apr £2,150.68)
  • ISA, Freetrade £3,155.58 (Apr £3,128.50)
  • ISA, Hargreaves Lansdown £2,985.23 (Apr £2,942.21)
  • Pensions £112,741.54 (Apr £111,546.97)
  • SAYE £570.00 (Apr £540.00)
  • House £375,000 (£360,099) *Nationwide HPI 2020 Q4

The emergency fund has recovered a bit this month, just glad we have that in place and that it is available for us to use.

Liabilities

  • Student Loan -£2,803.43 (Apr -£2,980.30)
  • Mortgage -£188,430.57 (Apr -£189,389.70)

Total Assets (excluding house) – Total Liabilities = Net Worth
£121,894.26 – £191,234 = -£69,339.74 (Apr -£72,061.72)

Month-on-month

The month-on-month figures look better compared to April with increases and decreases in the right places.

My Student Loan repayment is up by £5/month and my company pension contribution up by £11.33/month due to a pay rise effect from May.

Big turn around on the EF which is nice 🙂

Future Fund

Future Fund May 2021
Future Fund

Just a shade under the £120k mark now.

Dividends

Dividends May 2021

£2.78 for May, I’m looking forward to seeing how June compares year-on-year

Here’s a little look at the composition of my lazy portfolio…

I’ve got a bit of cash sitting in the ISA waiting for me to invest, things have been so busy at home I’ve not got round to it yet.

Guest Post

If you are interested in writing a guest post for my blog, you can reach out to me via the contact page or by taking a look at the let’s work together page – it would be great to hear from you!

Vanity Metrics

These are metrics which serve me no purpose other than to see progress, or lack of, in the social media universe.

Alexa ranking: #6880720 (Apr #6880720 )
Twitter followers: 524 (Apr 507)
Blog followers: 57 (Apr 52)

April 2021 update

This month gave me a right kick in the teeth with a car bill that I mentioned was upcoming last month. I knew it would be a few hundred but can you imagine the look on my face when the quote came through at £675!

Me, when having read the quote.

Around half of this was labour and tax but the other half was just for the coil springs, £175 each as they could only be supplied by Volvo. On previous cars, I could have bought an entire set of springs for that price!

Additional Income Streams

  • Matched Betting £16 (Mar -£80)
  • Surveys/studies £2.98 (Feb £8.79)
  • Amazon FBA/eBay £0 (Feb £0)
  • TopCashBack £0 (Mar £0)

Not much activity with the additional income this month, made a small profit with matched betting. I’ve got a few things listed on eBay which will sell at the start of next month so that will be something to look forward to.

I use a service called Odds Monkey to help with my matched betting, I’ve been using them for several months now and find the tools they provide to be essential in making a profit. If you are interested then drop me a message or you can sign-up via my affiliate link – OddsMonkey. The great thing is you can do as much or as little as you like and it fits around your life.

How did I do in April?

Assets

  • Emergency Fund £2,150.68 (Mar £2,446.58)
  • ISA, Freetrade £3,128.50 (Mar £3,009.24)
  • ISA, Hargreaves Lansdown £2,942.21 (Mar £2,913.33)
  • Pensions £111,546.97 (Mar £107,559.23)
  • SAYE £540.00 (Mar £510.00)
  • House £375,000 (£360,099) *Nationwide HPI 2020 Q4

With the car bill, I had to dip into the emergency fund so I’ll be replenshing the cash levels over the next few months.

We had our house valued this month as we are looking into the prospect of moving. We were pleasantly surprised with what the estate agent told us after having a look around. There are a few jobs that need doing to get the house up to scratch but nothing we weren’t aware of. I am using the lower end of the range as I appreciate there is still work to do.

Liabilities

  • Student Loan -£2,980.38 (Mar -£3,158.16)
  • Mortgage -£189,389.70 (Mar -£190,069.79)

Total Assets (excluding house) – Total Liabilities = Net Worth
£120,308.36 – £192,370.08 = -£72,061.72 (Mar -£76,789.57 )

Month-on-month

Last month I bought into Alibaba (the Chinese Amazon), this month I have added Baidu – the Chinese Google. Both are in my Freetrade General Investment Account so subject to any applicable taxes etc.

I have also increased my holding in Microsoft, I see them as a company that will continue growing for years to come. Not only are they in the consumer market with the Xbox etc. but also they are the second biggest provider of Cloud services behind Amazon. Interestingly, Alibaba are also a cloud provider so they tick several boxes for me.

Future Fund

Future Fund April 2021
Future Fund

The value of my Future Fund is up to £118,498.36 (£3,700 month-on-month), slowly edging to the £120k mark 🙂

Dividends

Dividends April 2021

A whopping 45 pence this month for dividends, not quite at the stage where I can start thinking about retirement! 😀

Guest Post

If you are interested in writing a guest post for my blog, you can reach out to me via the contact page or by taking a look at the let’s work together page – it would be great to hear from you!

Vanity Metrics

These are metrics which serve me no purpose other than to see progress, or lack of, in the social media universe.

I have reappeared on Modest Money so I am able to compare stats again, hopefully on a consistant basis.

Alexa ranking: #6880720 (Mar #6,700,360)
Twitter followers: 507 (Mar 437)
Blog followers: 52 (Mar 48)

March 2021 update

After my ever-so-late-in-the-month update for February, I told myself to be better prepared.

So, on the day the clocks went forward, I made a start on my March update. This will hopefully help me remember some of the things that have occurred too.

Earlier in the month, when I was picking my son up from work, I went over a speed bump and heard this loud crack. I was only going slowly so was pretty surprised but when I parked up and took a look around I couldn’t see anything wrong.

A little while later I was hearing this metallic clanging sound occasionally coming from where I heard the sound. Driving around one of the bumpy country roads the other day I heard something fall off and bounce along the road, when I went back and looked I found part of the coil spring had come off 😦

At least it explains the noise but I don’t fancy the repair bill which will be several hundred pounds.

I have been looking at moving to an electric car, with the MG ZS EV being the target of my attention but the difference between the asking price, even for an ex-demo, and my car is too great and the break-even point would be too far off.

No doubt I will revisit this in time though as I’m keen to reduce my impact on the environment. Talking of this, I watched a documentary on Netflix the other day called Seaspiracy and it was shocking to see the impact of fishing on the environment. Needless to say, I have now cut fish from my diet and got myself a supply of plant-based omega-3 – interestingly, omega-3 is only present in fish due to them eating these algae, I never knew that!


Have you watched Seaspriracy? What are your views on this – do you think the views are biased or are you glad that the issues are getting more attention?


Finishing on a positive note, the gym reopens on the 12th of April and I can’t wait!! It has been fine working out at home and I’ve noticed some gains but I also need the classes (restarting in May) to help shift some Covid pounds.

Additional Income Streams

  • Matched Betting £-80 (Feb £232)
  • Surveys/studies £8.79 (Feb £0)
  • Amazon FBA £0 (Feb £30)
  • TopCashBack £0 (Feb £0)

Matched betting went a bit sideways this month, the loss was due to part of a matched bet not being accepted. I usually make sure the lay bet is accepted before flipping on to the bookie’s site to place the back bet, this time however something must have happened that prevented the lay which I didn’t notice.

Allow the loss looked big, it was £120, it wasn’t money from my pocket as it was profit from previous months so “just” paper money. I would have preferred not to have lost it but it’s another lesson learnt.

I use a service called Odds Monkey to help with my matched betting, I’ve been using them for several months now and find the tools they provide to be essential in making a profit. If you are interested then drop me a message or you can sign-up via my affiliate link – OddsMonkey. The great thing is you can do as much or as little as you like and it fits around your life.

No sales on FBA this month as all my stock has been sold. I’ll be keeping an eye out for any more price reductions and bargains though…

How did I do in March?

Assets

  • Emergency Fund £2,446.58 (Feb £2,226.39)
  • ISA, Freetrade £3,009.24 (Feb £2,924.52)
  • ISA, Hargreaves Lansdown £2,913.33 (Feb £2,783.11)
  • Pensions £107,559.23 (Feb £103,498.91)
  • SAYE £510.00 (Feb £480.00)
  • House £360,099 (£350,883) *Nationwide HPI 2020 Q4

Liabilities

  • Student Loan -£3,158.16 (Feb -£3,376.77)
  • Mortgage -£190,069.79 (Feb -£190,464.67)

Total Assets (excluding house) – Total Liabilities = Net Worth
£116,438.38 – £193,227.95 = -£76,789.57 (Feb -£81,928.51 )

Month-on-month

This month, I have decided to replace the tracking of my payments against my student loan. At my current rate of repayment, I should be able to clear the loan within 18 months. The interest rate is 2.6%, less than my mortgage, but I am focussing on the loan so that I can then turn the monthly payment against my mortgage in time.

Next month I’ll include my Freetrade General Investment Account (GIA) as I’ve got a few free shares in there plus I’ve just added Alibaba which is like the Chinese Amazon. They are massive in China owning nearly 60% of the eCommerce market share there, that’s compared to just under 40% of the American market owned by Amazon. They are different though as Alibaba are primarily a B2B company whereas Amazon is a B2C.

I’ll also try to remember to include some graphics for my other portfolios; income, and tech.

Some may say that tech is a risky market to be in but working in that sector, I have a pretty good understanding of good companies that will be around for a while and those that won’t stick.

Future Fund

My Future Fund is continuing to march in the right direction. If I have another couple of months growth like this month’s then I could be seeing £120k sooner rather than later.

Dividends

A great month for dividend payments this month, still tiny compared to other people but my portfolio is still in it’s embryonic stage really.

Guest Post

Just in discussions with another blogger so I should hopefully have a new guest post next month or May.

If you are interested in writing a guest post for my blog, you can reach out to me via the contact page or by taking a look at the let’s work together page – it would be great to hear from you!

Vanity Metrics

These are metrics which serve me no purpose other than to see progress, or lack of, in the social media universe.

I have reappeared on Modest Money so I am able to compare stats again, hopefully on a consistant basis.

Alexa ranking: #6,700,360 (Feb #6,700,360)
Twitter followers: 437 (Feb 437)
Blog followers: 48 (Feb 46)

February 2021 update

I’m super-late publishing my February update and as a consequence, I can’t remember much to talk about for the month so I’ll crack straight on with things…

Additional Income Streams

  • Matched Betting £232 (Feb £30)
  • Surveys/studies £0 (Feb £5.82)
  • Amazon FBA £30 (Feb £37)
  • TopCashBack £0 (Feb £8.81)

The matched betting profit was exceptional compared to recent months, I made more bets and also took advantage of bet clubs and other offers. I think over the winter months I didn’t feel much like spending time in the evenings looking at bets and opted more for Netflix.

I use a service called Odds Monkey to help with my matched betting, I’ve been using them for several months now and find the tools they provide to be essential in making a profit. If you are interested then drop me a message or you can sign-up via my affiliate link – OddsMonkey. The great thing is you can do as much or as little as you like and it fits around your life.

FBA profits for February were made from the final sales of the items I sent in January. There was more competition in February which meant I needed to drop the sale price to shift my items, despite this I still was able to make a reasonable profit.

How did I do in Febraury?

Assets

  • Emergency Fund £2,226.39 (Jan £1750.00)
  • ISA, Freetrade £2,924.52 (Jan £2899.28)
  • ISA, Hargreaves Lansdown £2,783.11 (Jan £2,849.54)
  • Pensions £103,498.91 (Jan £100,040.25)
  • SAYE £480.00 (Jan £420.00)
  • House £360,099 (£350,883) *Nationwide HPI 2020 Q4

Liabilities

  • Student Loan -£3,376.77 (Jan -£3,516.77)
  • Mortgage -£190,464.67 (Jan -£190,422.22)

Total Assets (excluding house) – Total Liabilities = Net Worth
£111,912.93 – £193,841.44 = -£81,928.51 (Jan-£ 85,979.92)

Month-on-month

I reached a milestone this month, my Emergency Fund passed the £2,000 mark, next up is to achieve enough money to cover one month of expenses.

The Emergency Fund is now made of NS&I Premium Bonds, fund investment and cash.

There is a fair bit of discussion around what one should do with their EF cash. For me, the main attributes of my EF are that the money needs to be accessible within a few working days and that it needs to be set to work. The fund part of my EF is the “riskiest” but I am comfortable having it there earning dividends and potentially growing in value too.

This month’s pension figure includes Mrs Frugalist’s Nest pension for the first month which makes the pension gain look a bit nicer 😉

Future Fund

The main increaset this month is from the introduction of the Nest pension rather than any decent growth in the main pension.

Dividends

Above average dividends for this month, I’ll need to revisit the investment details so I can forecast when to expect further payments.

Guest Post

If you are interested in writing a guest post for my blog, you can reach out to me via the contact page or by taking a look at the let’s work together page – it would be great to hear from you!

Vanity Metrics

These are metrics which serve me no purpose other than to see progress, or lack of, in the social media universe.

I have reappeared on Modest Money so I am able to compare stats again, hopefully on a consistant basis.

Alexa ranking: #6,700,360 (Jan # 4,267,238 )
Twitter followers: 437 (Jan 382)
Blog followers: 46 (Jan 44)

January 2021 update

January was a really quiet month in most aspects of my life. It started off with the back-to-work blues, then my wife caught COVID-19 from work and a week later I caught it too. The worst part of it for me was the tiredness which lasted two to three weeks. During that time I didn’t really feel like doing much so things like matched betting took a backseat (which you’ll see further down the post).

What could have been a large outgoing this month turned out to be not so bad. My car was due it’s annual service and MOT at the end of January but instead of paying the £450 for the service by Volvo, I used Spencers, an independent garage in a nearby village, and paid just £145 for both the service and MOT.

One of the good things about becoming more financially aware is that I budget each month for expenditure such as the above so there wasn’t a moment of panic or a compulsion to reach for the credit card!

Additional Income Streams

  • Matched Betting £30 (Dec £51)
  • Surveys/studies £5.82 (Dec £5.72)
  • Amazon FBA £37
  • TopCashBack £8.81 (Dec £13.06)

I use a service called Odds Monkey to help with my matched betting, I’ve been using them for several months now and find the tools they provide to be essential in making a profit. If you are interested then drop me a message or you can sign-up via my affiliate link – OddsMonkey. The great things is you can do as much or as little as you like and it fits around your life.

My FBA profits came from two different items that I sent in having purchased them before Christmas. There were multiple units of each item, one of which has now sold out and the other is close to selling out too. I’m not going to disclose what the items are as they seem to be good sellers and I’m on the look on for further deals on them.

One item provided me with a 39% profit on a sales value of £16.96, and the other gave me 47% on £6.65. That’s not bad after the UPS fee and the FBA fees have been paid.

How did I do in January?

Assets

  • Emergency Fund £1,750 (Dec £1,500.00)
  • ISA, Freetrade £2,899.28 (Dec £3,611.82)
  • ISA, Hargreaves Lansdown £2,849.54 (Dec £2,713.38)
  • Pensions £100,040.25 (Dec £98,995.33)
  • SAYE £420.00 (Dec £420.00)
  • House £360,099 (£350,883) *Nationwide HPI 2020 Q4

Liabilities

  • Credit Card £0 (Dec -£950.99)
  • Student Loan -£3,516.77 (Dec -£3,656.77)
  • Mortgage -£190,422.22 (Dec -£190,092.68)

Total Assets (excluding house) – Total Liabilities = Net Worth
£107,959.07 – £193,938.99 = -£85,979.92 (Dec -£87,459.9)

Month-on-month

There was an adjustment to the value of my Freetrade ISA as I reallocated some funds.

I added £200 of NS&I premium bonds to my Emergency Fund this month, the rest of the month’s contributions remains in cash.

The good news is that I managed to clear the balance on my final credit card this month which frees me up to pay extra into my EF or pay down my student loan. It’s a great feeling to know I no longer have any debts owed to credit card companies 🙂

Almost forget to include Mrs Frugalist’s SIPP in the calculations as this is the first-month showing payment. I’ll have to look into her Nest pension organised by her company and get that added in next month.

Future Fund

Still moving in the right direction but gains on the smaller side this month.

Dividends

A lack of dividends paid this month looks naff but a payment for February sneaked its way into the screenshot!

Guest Post

If you are interested in writing a guest post for my blog, you can reach out to me via the contact page or by taking a look at the let’s work together page – it would be great to hear from you!

Vanity Metrics

These are metrics which serve me no purpose other than to see progress, or lack of, in the social media universe.

I can’t compare January to December using Modest Money as my blog appears to not be listed but these stats come from Alexa, Twitter and WordPress instead.

Alexa ranking: #4,267,238 (Dec #1,298,570)
Twitter followers: 382 (Dec 295)
Blog followers: 44 (Dec 29

December 2020 update

Just a few things of interest this month that impact my finances and work, and decent form by Norwich City at the top of the Championship, make it a month that I am reasonably happy with.

Tyres for 20″ wheels int cheap!

As all my money has a purpose each month, I utilised my Emergency Fund (EF) to cover the cost of two new tyres for my car. The reason for using the EF is that I keep next to no money in my current account, pretty much just what I need for groceries and petrol.

The company I bought the tyres from are based in Andorra so to protect myself I paid for them using a credit card and then immediately paid the balance off with the EF money. There were some indifferent reviews on the web but I have no complaints at all, the order process went fine and the tyres arrived three days later.

With work, I received my variation of contract making me a permanent home worker. Some of my office-based colleagues may say about costs increasing by WFH but the heating is still going to be on at the same times as my kids and wife are home at different points during the day. Electricity will increase slightly and the broadband bill will remain the same.

My company will be paying me £26 expenses per month directly to help offset WFH expenses, this is pretty handy as it means I will not have to make a claim to the Inland Revenue myself.

Additional Income Streams

  • Matched Betting £51 (Nov £137)
  • Surveys/studies £5.72 (Nov £10.21)
  • eBay £37
  • TopCashBack £13.06

The eBay income came from the sale of our old TV which had a broken screen (teenager + game console!). The guy who bought the TV wanted it to repair his broken unit so I felt happy with this sale as it helped prevent two TVs going to landfill. The proceeds went to help pay down my credit card bill 🙂

How did I do in December?

Assets

  • Emergency Fund £1,500 (£1,150.80)
  • ISA, Freetrade £3,611.82 (£3,546.79)
  • ISA, Hargreaves Lansdown £2,713.38 (£2,682.73)
  • Pensions £98,995.33 (£97,194.47)
  • SAYE £420.00 (£390.00)
  • House £350,883 (£350,883) *HPI current valuation

Liabilities

  • Credit Card -£950.99 (-£1,728.26)
  • Student Loan -£3,656.77 (-£3,806.77)
  • Mortgage -£190,092.68 (-£189,487.04)

Total Assets (excluding house) – Total Liabilities = Net Worth
£107,240.53 – £194,700.44 = -£87,459.91 (-£90,057.28)

Month-on-month

Not so much added to my FreeTrade ISA this month as I bulked up my emergency fund and paid a bit more than usual off my credit card.

My plan to clear the credit card debt in January might be pushed back to February now although it depends on additional repayments I can sneak in next month.

The pension contribution reflects an additional one per cent, that coupled with a new Vanguard SIPP I opened for Mrs Frugalist means that we are now putting 15% of our household income into pensions. That’s another personal milestone met 🙂

Future Fund

It’s nice to see the graph continuing to move up & right, this month’s gain puts me quite near the £110,000 mark and is a good way to end the year. Just over half of the gain is from the inclusion of my Hargreaves Lansdown ISA which was missing from last month’s FF.

Dividends

A late flurry of dividends this month gave me a nice fuzzy feeling as payments crept past the £8 mark for the month.

It’s nice to look ahead to the prospect of seeing how 2021 payments compare to 2020. Who knows what they will look like as amongst many things the economy will continue to be influenced by COVID-19 and also the departure from the EU.

Looking ahead to 2021

I’ll share my review of 2020 shortly and also my plans for 2021. I’m going to try and concentrate on the processes required to meet my goals rather than just the goals themselves, I think this level of planning will help with my motivation.

Guest Post

This month I had the opportunity to share a post from Martin at Studenomics, he shares his thoughts on what to look for in your first side hustle – things to watch out for and how to choose the right one.

If you are interested in writing a guest post for my blog, you can reach out to me via the contact page or by taking a look at the let’s work together page – it would be great to hear from you!

Vanity Metrics

These are metrics which serve me no purpose other than to see progress, or lack of, in the social media universe.

Alexa ranking: #1,298,570
Twitter followers: 295
Blog followers: 29

My Portfolio Structure

I thought it might be interesting to share the structure of my main portfolio – this is where I have calculated the percentage break-downs for different markets based on my level of comfort.

There are several rules of thumb for determining the split between equities and bonds such as subtracting your age from 100 to give you the bonds (your age) and equities (the remainder) split.

As I didn’t get started with FIRE until “late on” i.e. my forties, I have gone for a more aggressive split of 20% bonds/80% equities.

At the broadest level, my equities are made up of 85% global and 15% emerging markets.

This is then diversified like:

  • 25% Domestic
  • 50% Developed World
  • 15% Emerging Markets
  • 10% Global Commercial Real Estate

Finally, we can take a look at the tilted version of my portfolio. The percentages might look a little odd with the decimal place but I haven’t figured out how to sort that yet, the table values look fine but must have some formatting applied. Anyhow…

And with bonds included in the mix.

The actual current holdings in my portfolio are shown below, you’ll notice that there are a few areas that I am yet to invest in. I need to do more research in these areas and identify suitable trackers/ETFs.

DomesticMarket/EquityVanguard FTSE 100 ETF (Dist)VUKE
SPDR S&P UK DividendUKDV
ValueVanguard FTSE 250VMID
Small Cap??
Developed WorldMarket/EquityVanguard FTSE All-World ETF (Dist)VWRL
Value??
Small Cap??
GlobalSmall CapBlackrock Global Smaller CompaniesBRSC
Emerging MarketsMarketVanguard Emerging Markets ETFVFEM
iShares Core MSCI Emerging Markets ETF (Acc)EMIM
Value & Small Cap??
Global Commercial Real EstatePropertyiShares Developed Markets Property Yield (Dist)IWDP
BondsShort-dated, high quality bondsVanguard UK Gilt ETF (Dist)VGOV
Short-dated, high quality, inflation-linked bondsiShares Indexed UK GiltsINXG

It would be good to hear how your portfolio compares to mine by way of split and how you decided on the allocation of equities and bonds.